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Conservative Law Professor Sighted

Posted By Malcolm A. Kline On December 21, 2011 @ 1:49 pm In Faculty Lounge | No Comments

We’ve actually found a rare academic species—a conservative law school professor. “Arizona has more than 350 miles of sparsely populated international border,” Jan C. Ting [1], a professor at the Beasley School of Law at Temple University, writes on Philly.com. “Since effective border fencing was installed in the adjoining San Diego and El Paso sectors, Arizona has become the main entryway for illegal border-crossers.”

“The Obama administration has been trying to have things both ways: recognizing a limit on immigrants, but not enforcing it. Arizona can’t wait.”

On Rate My Professors. Com [2], most of Dr. Ting’s anonymous student reviewers, pro and con, acknowledge his conservatism. What they differ on is whether it affects his pedagogy.

Because the cons cannot point to specific instances of bias, the professor seems to win out by default on this score. Moreover, the specifics given indicate that, while his lectures may be dry, they are distinctly academic in the traditional sense:

One reviewer wrote that “He literally reads the tax code in class and then asks us what we think about it, which usually results in silence.”

Malcolm A. Kline is the Executive Director of Accuracy in Academia [3].

If you would like to comment on this article, e-mail mal.kline@academia.org [4]


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We’ve actually found a rare academic species—a conservative law school professor. “Arizona has more than 350 miles of sparsely populated international border,” Jan C. Ting: http://twitter.com/share

[2] Rate My Professors. Com: http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowRatings.jsp?tid=222496

[3] Accuracy in Academia: http://academia.org/

[4] mal.kline@academia.org: mailto:mal.kline@academia.org

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