Government Subsidies & Bondage

, Kristin Theresa Jaroma, Leave a comment

Educating America on the economic and moral dangers of equal wealth distribution promoted by the federal government creates “a terrific opportunity to help people understand what creates prosperity, and what kills it; what civil government, can and can’t, should and shouldn’t do about it,” Leslie Carbone, author of Slaying Leviathan: The Moral Case for Tax Reform said at The Heritage Foundation’s Bloggers Briefing, this week.

Carbone is the former executive director of Accuracy in Academia. “We have the opportunity to re-take the moral high ground in a debate over wealth redistribution,” Carbone said at Heritage on Tuesday October 5, 2010.

She also worked as an analyst at the Family Research Council, specializing in tax issues.

There are two principle reasons why the federal government should not partake of the business of wealth redistribution, Carbone argued.

First of all, it is ineffective and obstructive. Wealth redistribution does not foster prosperity. Neither does it distribute prosperity.

Second of all, it does not contribute to the function of the federal government. The government’s job is not to make life equally fair for all, or synthesize the equality of opportunity. Rather, that is the purpose of the national economic market; free people working for value and growth and trade.

According to the United States Declaration of Independence, the federal government’s primary purpose is to secure rights. If this is not so or no longer applies, “then we lose the moral basis for believing that the United States of America is a sovereign nation.”

When one or more individual rights are violated, such as being stolen from, the government ought to be equipped to enforce punishment against this. But, when the government becomes the primary factor in wealth redistribution, it takes wealth from some citizens, not because they broke any natural law or violated another’s right, but rather because they had acquired more wealth than another. In such engagement, the government “perverts its own function, and misuses injustice, the power it has been granted to maintain justice.”

Wealth redistribution “suppresses prosperity” and further, can cause “moral harm.” Virtuous behavior that creates a prosperous household and prosperous community, and even such a nation at large, is put down and unrewarded. Ethical behavior such as hard work, financial saving, personal investment, and a sense of responsibility go unspoken for in a country that endorses equal redistribution of the earned wealth.

“When the government seizes from a family or individual more than is necessary to protect their rights, it diminishes their economic freedom… [and] their moral freedom.”

The social engineering the federal government practices through the tax code shows a specific gearing toward the family and individual households of America to try and dip into their decision making, assuming a “moral power that the State shouldn’t have.”

As thinkers, as writers, as American people, there is an obligation to morally and economically oppose equal wealth distribution. In taking on of such business, the federal government is doing “much too much.”

“Freedom works everywhere,” Carbone stated. “People are better off economically, better off morally if they have the freedom to create wealth in the way that they are uniquely talented and positioned to do. Look to themselves and to their families first, and to the government last of all.”

Kristin Theresa Jaroma is an intern at the American Journalism Center, a training program run by Accuracy in Media and Accuracy in Academia.

If you would like to comment on this article, e-mail mal.kline@academia.org.

Ms. Carbone will appear at AIA’s 25th anniversary reception at Ebenezer’s coffeehouse on Capitol Hill from 6-8 PM on October 14, 2010, free to D. C. area staff and interns.