UT-Austin Unrepentant on Affirmative Action

, Nick Kowalski, 2 Comments

For higher education administrators, affirmative action remains a topic of concern. In Fisher v. The University of Texas at Austin, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that race can be a determining factor regarding student admission. Speaking on an educational panel at a conference in Austin, Dr. Gregory Vincent –University of Texas’ Vice President for Diversity and Community Engagement – bragged about his institution’s legal victory. “I was actually encouraged by the Supreme Court endorsing this idea that diversity is a compelling interest,” said Vincent, adding that “the idea that all students benefit from having exposure to students from different backgrounds.”

university of texas-austin

But simply admitting and rejecting applicants on the basis of race is not enough, Vincent avers. “If all of the students of color come from poor, first-generation backgrounds, how does that break down stereotypes?” According to him, colleges ought to actively seek out students according to an array of non-academic demographics. “We need to make sure that these students come from all groups, all socioeconomic backgrounds,” declares Vincent in a plea for even greater admissions flexibility.

While Vincent acknowledges that universities “are prohibited from using quotas” he is committed to accepting “underrepresented minority students.” “I think that one of the strongest parts of our case is that we were able to demonstrate how race was truly just one factor among many,” boasts Vincent. “Candidly, the bigger issue is how do we increase the number of students who are in that holistic admissions pool, and getting more of those students there and making them more competitive once they’re in that pool, so that’s where the challenge is.”

Vincent also went on the offensive against fraternal organizations: “I think Greek life is a real challenge on our campuses… it is something that we will have to pay significant attention to.” “We are going to have to take that on.” But won’t that cut down on the diversity?

 

2 Responses

  1. Miller

    May 12, 2015 10:19 am

    Hey mister smart guy, you know what i would like? I would like to know that when i go to a doctor, said doctor is a doctor because he passed all the tests, not because he was the right color or poor enough. If you all want to have a play school, be my guest, but could we not also have real schools where actual grades are used to determine who will design our planes?

  2. Matt Campbell

    May 17, 2015 6:27 am

    They will have passed, because passing and admissions are graded on the Curve. But there will be many that were not the best candidates, and not the best students. The best will always get in. Quality will suffer at the middle and lower ranks where underqualified students received boosts over those that perform better on the basis of their added “diversity.”

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